TapeOp Interviews – Tony Rolando & Kelly Kelbel

Some great insight of the beginnings of Make Noise and Make Noise Records. Make Noise Records is currently experiencing delays with the pressing plant for the MNR005/Surachai release. No release date yet.

What prompted you to assemble The Shared System and develop a Music series?

Tony: I was thinking about advertising and thought for $2,000 why not put out a record? So we contacted artists that work with and support us. They do cool videos, talk to people about the modules and our company, so we decided on something that would be good for everyone. We’d give five artists the same collection of modules, called The Shared System. With all things equal, the variable wouldn’t be the studio, the recording process or instrument, it would be the artist. We’d see how their personalities would shine through. I feel like reverb is such an important part of electronic music, so we let them use their own reverb, but everything else was the same. Hopefully, the records would get people talking about the Make Noise Shared System, but also what someone like Richard Devine did with it. I met with Surachai, in New York City, at the Control Voltage Fair. He loved the idea and wanted to curate it. I didn’t want to have five artists make five records that all sounded the same, and felt confident he would pick artists who were diverse enough to show all the directions you could go with a modular, but were also well-versed with our system, so they could get started fast. Like you noticed when you borrowed ours, even for someone who knows how to use modulars, there’s always a massive learning curve. So much of music technology today is designed to do some specific task. You can get an app to make hip-hop beats or a compressor to give you the vocal sound of The Beatles’ records or whatever. What’s gorgeous about the modular synthesizer is that it’s the exact opposite of that. Often, at trade shows, people will ask me, “What problem is your product solving?” Typically I say that it’s creating them. This product does not solve a single problem, unless you say it solves the problem of inspiration. It provides a great deal of that.

Kelly: The Shared System series shows people that there are many different ways to make music with it. Richard Devine did the first record, the second one’s by Alessandro Cortini, then Robert A. A. Lowe. Surachai makes a sort of synth-inspired black metal, so we have no idea what his will be like. It’s all to showcase that people are making music that spans a lot of different genres. Five in the series, 500 copies, pressed to vinyl. Trash Audio is selling most of them, but if you order a Shared System, we include whatever record is currently in production. Our dealers that sell the modules can also order them. We’re talking about building another system and doing an Acid series.

TapeOp Full Interview

Soundworks Collection: The Sound of Interstellar

In this exclusive SoundWorks Collection sound profile we talk with Supervising Sound Editor and Sound Designer Richard King about the sound teams extensive work on Director Christopher Nolan’s immersive sci-fi film Interstellar.

Post-NIN Justin

What have you been doing after NIN?

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Source

Night Out

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“The best was when I was walking out of the club, with all three of them, and this thug dude asked me me in front of a crowd, ‘how do you do it man?” Teach me your ways’.

I told him to just buy a drum machine, he looked at me completely puzzled and everyone outside was laughing.” – Richard Devine

In The Studio: Clark

Excerpt:
So achieving that on Clark meant mostly using software?

Yeah, I learned Ableton on this album—I had used Logic before—and it completely changed how I worked. I really went into it, and like a month later, I thought, “Yes, this is the program.” It’s so good. My Logic arrangements were like 60 tracks and a timeline that goes on for an hour—like, “There’s a sketch there, this bit is a sort of counterpoint…” It was just a mess, but my Ableton song files are so streamlined. That’s when I started getting my confidence back.

In The Studio: Clark

Yaybahar by Görkem Şen

Yaybahar by Görkem Şen from Olgu Demir on Vimeo.

This is an acoustic instrument with no electricity or anything… Natural source coded materials which are membrane, coiled spring and string working together. Maybe we can say that this is a new bridge system between string and resonant body. But generally this is a new design and emit obviously natural vibrations and gives new playing abilities.
Very important that it has totally a unique live listening experience!!
Credits
————-
Instrument: Yaybahar
Performence: Görkem Şen
Video: Levent Bozkurt
Video editting: Olgu Demir
Sound mix: Mert Aksuna
Place: Alişler Yurdu
2014

Noyzelab – Aphex Twin SYROBONKERS! Interview Part 1 & 2

Excerpt:

dave:how accurate is the gear list on syro?

rich: definitely not 100% and there are 1 or 2 mistakes, like i think it says i used a vocoder on the piano track , dot in wrong place or i prob did it wrong, it is mostly right though but misses out a shit load of outboard as i couldn’t remember every eq etc in my lodge.
There were a few plugins used but hardly anything and not worth mentioning really, it is 99.9% hardware not that it matters just sayin.
Plenty more eurorack modules as well obviously but i think i put down the main ones i could remember.
Actually the whole equipment list is pretty weird choices on there actually pretty normal/odd for me i think, its definitely not showing off when u take into account what else I’ve got! just so happened those particular tracks used those things.
the birds on that piano track by the way were picked up by the mic’s at the same time, i angled them slightly towards the doors to pick it up, the birds hear what I’m doing also !-)
Oh and its all programmed, I think I’ve almost got to the point now when i can think music and then program it pretty much in one go, not quite but almost, it was never an ambition actually, it just happened that way.
Most people I know who heard it think its played, which is a really nice complement, coz every little timing imperfection in that is purposefully programmed in…i find it very mediative doing such tiny little things, tempo is regular though so it could be mixed with amen break :)

Part 1
Part 2

Mutable Instruments – Peaks Speaks!

Mothership Transmission: Basimilus Acid

Mothership Transmission: Basimilus Acid from Joseph Fraioli on Vimeo.

trigger shifting using the delptronics triggerman and 4ms SCM as trigger sources with shifting modifications coming from the SSF propagate and 4ms SCM breakout.
slight changes to the parameters of these modules slowly change the shift of the patterns over longer periods. this is achieved by modulating the SSF propagates master delay modulation and enable inputs then outputting those triggers to the 4ms SCM to be further shifted using the SCM breakout and then fed into the 4MS RCD for additional triggering.
kick: blue lantern asteroid bd v4
snare: make noise mysteron modulated by the mod can quad lfo > Make Noise erbe verbe moded by an intellijel dixie.
hats: SSF quantum rainbow > Modcan Dual Delay. dual delay moded by an SSF ultra random analog.
acidy bass: Noise Engineering Basimilus Iteritas in bass mode >make noise MMG> mungo d0 with macro machines storage strip sequenced by the 4ms scm. pitch controlled by pressure points which is triggered by the 4ms SCM and pitch quantized by the intellijel upscale. modulation sources from a doepfer a147 and modcan quad lfo.
sparse melodic bass thing in first half: make noise DPO >Make Noise MMG > TipTop ZDSP with halls of Valhalla card. pitch sequencing by the TipTop z8000. modulations from a make noise maths channel and SSF ultra random analog.
end ambience: qu-bit nebulae > RT60. WMD SSM used as a mute. granulated sound source is a piano melody.
no computers or external hardware were used in this performance :)

Peter Speer: Duet for Brett Balogh

We are busy and plan to stay that way…

Duet for Brett Balogh from Peter Speer on Vimeo.

Make Noise Erbe Verb in a duet with the AM band.
Radio is processed through a 5-band resonator. Nanokontrol faders 1-5 control the levels of each band; fader 6 is the resonator’s wet/dry mix; fader 7 is the Erbe Verb’s level, fader 8 is the radio’s level.

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